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AUGUST 28, 2015

 

LEVEL OF RIVERS & SHUSWAP LAKE

WERE LOWERED TO ALLOW MARINE TRAVEL

When Jack Brooke’s second uncle came to Salmon Arm in 1898, he found the Salmon River so full of salmon that he could almost walk over it. The town’s first wharf was built in 1907 and steamers docked there all summer. Things changed, I wrote in this column on Nov. 8, 1987. The Salmon River has only the odd salmon, the lake level is so low that flat-bottomed houseboats cannot come to the new wharf, and the channel is nearly dry this fall.

The level of Shuswap Lake is VERY low, I wrote then. Near the wharf at Salmon Arm, one can see silt that was deposited through a hose during dredging operations years ago. Near the Squilax bridge you can see piles of earth on either side of the bank where river bottom was dredged and deposited to lower the river.

 

LITTLE RIVER WAS DREDGED IN EARLY FIFTIES

Shuswap Lake flooded in 1948 and it changed everything on the lake. Silt from the Salmon Valley was carried everywhere. The water was so high that it covered the railway tracks and trains crawled through Salmon Arm as if they were rolling on water.

In the early fifties, a dredge worked to provide a channel for navigation between Shuswap Lake and Kamloops. And the river between Chase and Kamloops was dredged, too, I wrote in 1987. It was lowered five to eight feet. After that, the level of Shuswap Lake was about four feet lower and mud flats began to appear near Salmon Arm.

 

SEE A PICTURE OF THE RUBBER DAM

Bridgestone promoted a rubber dam for water control. Compared with steel gates, it is lower in cost, has exceptional reliability, and is virtually maintenance-free. To see a sketch, go to the Lakeshore News office and pick up the bound book of 1988 copies of Salmon Arm Shoppers’ Guides. Go to the March 21 issue and turn to page 21.

 

TAKE A RIDE 20 KM HIGH IN A PNEUMATIC ELEVATOR

Last week a Canadian space company was given the patent by the U.S. to build a 20-km tower for astronauts to be sent directly into the stratosphere. The pneumatic tube will have a space elevator that can carry 12 people. CEO Caroline Roberts said the tower will be used for communications, tourism, and the production of electricity from wind. See pictures by googling Thoth Technology.

 

MOUTH-WATERING LOCAL CUISINE

AT HANEY’S HARVEST CELEBRATION

Come and sample some of the best that restaurants, delis, wineries and breweries in the Shuswap have to offer. On Sunday, Sept. 13 from 3 to 6 p.m., enjoy the sample-sized offerings during the 18th year of the Harvest Celebration at R. J. Haney Heritage Village & Museum. Tickets are $25 and include three sample tickets. Additional tickets can be purchased for $3 each. Tickets sell out fast for this event and can be purchased by calling 250-832-5243, or buying at R.J. Haney Heritage Village at 751-Hwy 97B or at the checkout at Askew’s Foods. No minors please. I bought mine at Askew’s for $25 plus tax.

While at the celebration, you can explore the village, museum and beautiful gardens. Check out the silent auction table and bid on items donated by local businesses and individuals. You won’t want to miss this afternoon of food, drink and entertainment at R.J. Haney Heritage Village & Museum. www.salmonarmmuseum.org.

 

A THIRD TIMMIES FOR SALMON ARM

Coming Soon signs at SmartCentres show that Tim Hortons is joining Winners and Dollarama as a new tenant near Walmart in the spring. That’s such good news!

SUPPORT FOR GRINDROD SENIORS

Grindrod seniors are able to get services from Enderby and Sicamous according to a report in the Okanagan Advertiser of a meeting held at the Grindrod Recreation Centre. It was hosted by Carol Domshy, Grindrod seniors’ group co-ordinator.

Susan Kendall, senior program co-ordinator at the Enderby & District Community Resource Centre, said Enderby’s sunshine phone line is available to Grindrod seniors. Each would be connected with a phone buddy who would check in with the senior every day for a short chat.

Janet McClean-Senft, executive director at Eagle Valley Community Support Centre in Sicamous, said Grindrod seniors are covered under many of the Better at Home programs.

Carol Domshy said more meetings for seniors will be held so they will know of programs that are available. She said a seniors’ support group is needed because Grindrod has no bus or taxi service to get them to Enderby, Salmon Arm or Vernon.

 

ROCK CREEK CAN LEARN FROM BARRIERE

Over 30 homes in Rock Creek were lost during a recent forest fire that was probably started by a discarded cigarette butt. Rock Creek is located at the south end of the Okanagan Valley, not far from the U.S. border. People who lost their homes are not sure if they will rebuild.

In 2003, Barriere, located east of Kamloops, lost many homes and businesses during a major human-caused forest fire. It destroyed both homes and industry, most notably a sawmill that was a large local employer.

On August 19, CBC radio interviewed a woman from Barriere on how they coped after the huge loss. She said the community pulled together, formed committees, and helped one another. There was always someone they knew and trusted, to ask for help, someone who could break through the red tape. A year later, much was done in the recovery, and two years later, residents hardly knew there had been a huge loss.

 

NANIMAHOO’S NATIVE ART GALLERY EXHIBITION, SALE

Audrey Nanimahoo invites you to her gallery to see original oil paintings, stone carvings, ceramics, and jewellery made by various local and non-local artists. Opening reception Fri., Sept. 4, 6-10 p.m. Exhibition dates Fri., 4-6, Sat & Sun. 8-10 p.m. 4154 Malakwa Rd., 15 min. east of Sicamous, 2 km east of Mal-Mar store. www.audreynanimahoo.com and Facebook. 250-804-5365

 

KINDALE THRIFT SHOP RECYCLES ONLY CLOTHING

Their brochure will be re-written to emphasize that Kindale Thrift Shop in Salmon Arm and Armstrong recycles clothing only. People in Salmon Arm have been so generous. After they read here that it recycles, some people have been delivering newspapers, tin cans, etc., but they don’t recycle those. Take them to bins at Bill’s Bottle Depot or at one of CSRD’s landfill sites or garbage collection places.

Kindale can always use more volunteers at the Salmon Arm store. It has two paid employees and many volunteers who do the same jobs of being on cash, sorting donations and filling displays. Fill an application form at the store.

 

GREATEST NUMBER OF HOCKEY PLAYERS RETURNING

At a Silverbacks’ town hall meeting in the city’s council chambers on Aug. 18, Troy Mick, president and general manager, said this year sees the greatest number of players coming back for the season. They liked the community, the fans, the facility, and the staff. They do not get paid. They play for the experience and for the potential to move up in the hockey world.

The players introduced themselves and said what they did over the summer. Two of them were encouraged to show a tattoo on their right upper arms, and each player was applauded.

 

CAR TROUBLE IN CALGARY

I had a wonderful time at a Ukrainian Festival in Andrew, Alberta last weekend, and visited with a few relatives from Edmonton and in Calgary. Just before leaving for home, I filled the car with gas in Calgary, then couldn’t get the key to work in the ignition. It happened before, in Salmon Arm a year ago. Doug Toop of Master Locksmith Services sprayed it and got it working, but said it might need a new ignition assembly.

In Calgary, locksmiths do not work on SmartCars so I had the car towed three blocks to a Mercedes Benz dealership. Bad news, it needed a new ignition assembly but they are on back order from Germany. It might take 10 days to arrive. A company shuttle took me to the bus depot and on Monday I took a 7 p.m. Greyhound bus to Salmon Arm. Alberta was very smoky for three days from forest fires in the State of Washington. I was glad I wasn’t driving through smoke at night.

 

ARRIVING IN BEAUTIFUL SALMON ARM AT NIGHT

Greyhound to Vancouver was full, and it has strict rules that passengers must obey, so it was a pleasant journey. I will use the bus again.

Arriving in Salmon Arm at night is impressive. The lights of the city are so welcoming! We are fortunate to have Salmon Am Taxi that arrives at the bus depot within 10 minutes of being phoned. Cars are clean and drivers are pleasant.

How convenient it is to have Budget’s ad on the front page of Lakeshore News! I was able to phone and reserve a rental car in the middle of the night with an employee who had never heard of Salmon Arm. She gave me a quote for 10 days, and said a small car would be ready for me tomorrow at 1 p.m. When I called the local office at 1 p.m. to see if the car was there, I was told I had booked it for the next day. That was okay. I had time to listen to phone messages, respond to emails, and rest from the night journey.

 

 

AUGUST 21, 2015

 

LOOKING BACK TO THE DROUGHT OF ’87, ‘88

It was tough being president of the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce in 1987 because instead of promoting the town, my focus was on preserving the town during a drought that saw mud under the new wharf. Eugene Lalonde, administrator of CSRD, looked into ways of regulating the level of Shuswap Lake during the summer. He produced a detailed study, distributed copies and I still have one. He gave a report on the study to the chamber membership. This is the report from Salmon Arm Shoppers’ Guide, as it was called before Lakeshore News:

 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HEARS OF STUDY OF REGULATING LEVEL OF SHUSWAP LAKE

Reprinted from Monday, March 21, 1988, Salmon Arm Shoppers’ Guide

By Sally Scales

Eugene Lalonde, administrator of the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, was the main speaker at the March 16 general meeting of the Salmon Arm & District Chamber of Commerce. He reported on the review he has made into the concept of raising Shuswap Lake every summer.

The study was instigated after Jack Brooke approached the regional district board to install gates under the Squilax bridge, similar to those near Whitehorse, to raise the level of Shuswap Lake during the peak tourism period. The board instructed its administrator to look into the matter, and Eugene has now circulated 40 or 50 copies of his report to various government agencies and tourism related businesses around the lake.

“We manage trees, agricultural land and fish,” he told the chamber. “Here we have a resource that’s flowing past our door and we are not managing it.” He emphasized that he was speaking in a technical capacity. He was not there representing the board.

“Shuswap Lake has a high fluctuation,” Eugene said. While he could not speculate if raising the level was good or bad, he said it is an intriguing concept. While there would never be an increase in the lake level during high water, it is possible to retain freshet water to better utilize the lake’s resource. Raising the level would add hundreds of acres for rearing fish. It could reduce the amount of milfoil. While there would be positives, there would also be negatives, he said.

Two systems for raising the lake are possible. One is a series of steel gates to hold back the water, and the other is an inflatable rubber tube, like a large sausage across the river, anchored along the bottom. The latter is made by Bridgetown. It started in Japan, and 1,000 such rubber tubes can now be found all over the world. It can hold back up to 20 feet of water.

Responses to the concept review should be in by the end of May. If there is sufficient positive feedback, the regional board would likely approve the next step: establishing a task force of agencies working with the lake to study the plan. If they approve, then an environmental impact study would be made.

 

LAKE LEVEL STABILIZATION DIES

At the July CSRD board meeting, the concept of lake stabilization of Shuswap Lake was shot down because it received a lot of opposition. Fifty copies of the survey were sent to a variety of people. Of the 25 respondents, five were in favour, 17 were against and three were somewhere in between.

 

NORTH SHUSWAP CHAMBER PROPOSED A BRIDGE FROM SALMON ARM TO SEYMOUR ARM

Following Eugene Lalonde’s presentation to the Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce on March 16, 1988, Al Christopherson and Bob Rogers of Celista, members of the North Shuswap Chamber of Commerce, sold High ‘N Dry share certificates for a bridge that they proposed will be built from Salmon Arm to Seymour Arm. The certificates were available at the Shoppers’ Guide for a dollar, or could be ordered by sending two dollars to the North Shuswap Chamber of Commerce, Celista, B.C. V0E 1L0

 

ROOTS & BLUES FESTIVAL A SMASHING SUCCESS

Sunday afternoon, everyone I spoke to at the Roots & Blues Festival in Salmon Arm deemed it a success. The first day, August 14, 2015 an evening thunderstorm and cloudburst cooled things off. Saturday the grounds were packed all day and evening. Sunday’s crowd was smaller but the music was great.

Sue Kershaw, president of Citizens’ Patrol, and I spent four hours patrolling all the R&B campgrounds twice, making sure all was well. Riding in a golf cart was certainly easier than walking, as we were last year. We helped solve some problems, answered a few questions, and waved to many.

 

MANY NON-ROOTS & BLUES EXHIBITORS

The festival grounds had ever-so-many food concessions and booths selling Canadian-made goods. On Sunday I visited the booths that were there because of the crowds: Shuswap Tourism, ShuswapTrail Rider, TD Bank, The Giving Tree, Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, R.J. Haney Village & Museum, CSRD with Invasive Species Society, Immigrant Services Shuswap, and Silver Creek Elementary PAC selling bottled water and taking donations for buying Montessori supplies.

The festival grounds seemed more open this year. The many trees planted by the society have matured and provide most welcome shade, and there were many picnic tables throughout the grounds. It was an excellent festival!

 

B.C. WELCOMES 14 NEW FAMILY DOCTORS

Rural areas are welcoming 14 internationally trained doctors to 11 communities, and all pledge to stay three years. Doctors trained outside Canada are spending three months with a B.C. physician who evaluates their skills. The BC Ministry of Health announced that single physicians will set up practices in Dawson Creek, McBride, Terrace, Quesnel, Hazelton, Invermere, Castlegar and Powell River. Fort St. John, Lillooet and Port Hardy will each welcome two general practitioners. 

In the fall, another 16 doctors will arrive in the $2.8-million Practice Ready Assessment pilot program. They will work in small B.C. communities as part of a program to provide better primary health care in rural areas.

 

AGE OF CONSENT FOR MARRIAGE FOR WOMEN CHANGED FROM SEVEN TO SIXTEEN

Dr. Kellie Leitch, Federal Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women, visited the Okanagan and stopped in Salmon Arm on Friday, August 14 for coffee with Conservative candidate Mel Arnold and supporters. Afterwards, she and Mel knocked on a few doors and visited the Roots & Blues Festival.

Kellie is a practicing doctor in Ontario. When she was given the Status of Women portfolio she was horrified when she discovered that seven was the legal age of consent for women to marry. She and fellow MP Peter McKay changed it to 16.

In her portfolio, three major changes were made to assist women. The first was Women’s Entrepreneurship, chaired by Arlene Dickinson of Dragon’s Den, in which the government made $700-million capital available for women to access. The second was a Women’s Trade Mission, and the third was a large mentorship program for younger women.

 

ENDERBY WINEMAKER WAS RAISED IN CROATIAN WINE TRADITION

Have a sample of wine from Waterside Winery at the Shuswap Farmers’ Market behind Centenoka Park Mall in Salmon Arm. Branko Juric, who owns the winery with his wife Debbie, is kept busy promoting and selling wine. He was so busy that I had to stop at both Tuesday and Friday markets to get information for this news item.

Branko was in mining, then he and Debbie owned gas stations, the most recent at Danforth’s Corner for six years. They have been growing grapes for seven years and making wine for three at 70 Waterside Road north of Enderby, between Highway 97B and the Shuswap River.  www.watersidewinery.com and on Facebook.

 

FOOD FOREST WOULD NEED A VOLUNTEER

Last week I asked what we would plant in a food forest. Terrance from Blind Bay wrote: “It’s possible that this idea could work in Salmon Arm but only because the possibility of abuse is less than it would be in Seattle. For Seattle, I think the plan will fail big time and is yet another ludicrous idea not at all suited for a large city with no end of ‘low lives’ and irresponsible people. Sad to have to say that but that’s the reality these days!

“Greed and abuse aside, I wonder how a partaker would know what would be considered fair and reasonable to remove. And on how many occasions is it right to do it. It might help if there were a volunteer on site taking donations for some worthy cause. People would be free to donate or not.”

 

WINNERS & DOLLARAMA COMING SOON

It’s great to see the activity near Walmart where SmartCentres announced two more businesses will open in 2016: Winners and Dollarama. Salmon Arm has certainly benefitted by having Walmart open in its second summer. Last summer not all tourists to the Shuswap knew we had a Walmart. The downtown has been so busy this summer that there is hardly a parking space available when I want it.

 

 

AUGUST 14, 2015

 

LOOKING BACK TO THE START OF ROOTS & BLUES

I remember when the Roots & Blues Festival began to grow to the point that Salmon Arm was full of tourists who had no place to stay. The town didn’t have the Super 8, the Comfort Inn, the Prestige, the Best Western and the Travelodge. Campground operators were opposed to any camping being allowed in non-established sites (such as in fields, etc) because their season was very short. The town had only a few bed and breakfasts.

Entertainers at Roots & Blues and their support staff required lodging in hotels, as they do now. That left little room for highway travellers who looked at a highway map and chose to spend the night in Salmon Arm. Some were close to tears when told they would have to drive to Vernon, Revelstoke or Kamloops.

 

RENT AN UNUSED RV, FOLKS, OR JUST A BED

I felt guilty during the early days because I produced the Shuswap Visitors’ Guide and invited people to holiday here, but on that one weekend a year of the Roots & Blues festival, there was no room at the inn.

Through this column I invited residents to provide a place for travellers to sleep. They could rent an unused RV, or provide just a bed in part of their home, such as a basement. None did. Some B&B operators offered space.

I delivered small posters to hotels along the highway that said JUST-A-BED. It had my phone number and when someone called, I put that person in touch with someone who had a bed.

 

NOW, RENT YOUR PLACE ON THE INTERNET

Turn your home, spare room, or vacation house into a goldmine, says Tripadvisor. Advertise it for free and reach millions of paying guests waiting to book. Pay nothing up front and then just three per cent on each booking you receive. Protected online payments and many reviews give travellers confidence to book. https://rentals-fk.tripadvisor.com

 

FREE CAKE, JUICE AND CORN

AS A WAY OF SAYING THANK YOU!

One week from now, the Shuswap Farm and Craft Market is having a Customer Appreciation Day. It will be on Friday, August 21 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free cake, juice and corn on the cob will be served to customers as a way of saying thank-you for your support.

 

NEWCOMER WANTS TO RIDE LONELY HORSES

Howie, 50-ish, says he was probably riding horses before he could walk. His dad was a big-game guide and outfitter. For grades 9 to 12, Howie travelled by school bus 75 km. from Seton Portage to Lillooet and stayed in a dorm all week. His dad sold all the horses, including Howie’s, which broke his heart.

It wasn’t until he was 40 and volunteered for Unity Ride from Harrison Lake to Vernon that he got over his hurt. A year later he had four horses, but hasn’t had any for six years. While going to university he worked with rescue horses in Richmond. Now that he lives in Salmon Arm he wants to work with horses that are lonely and bored and need a human companion. His riding boots are in his truck. Contact me at 250-832-4831 or sallys1@telus.net and I’ll pass the message on.

 

DONATION TO FUNDRAISER INCREASED FROM BASKET OF SAMPLES TO A MEAL-IN-A-FIELD

Fieldstone Organics near Armstrong usually gives a basket of organic samples when asked for a donation for a fundraiser. In the spring, the firm’s production co-ordinator, who is president of the Vernon Lions Club, suggested a unique fundraiser. Lions were raising funds for independent living youth programs and the Schubert Centre hearing loop. She said in addition to donating a basket of product for the live and silent auction, Fieldstone should increase the value of the donation by creating a meal-in-the-field package for six people. And so it did.

On July 24 a party of six friends from Lake Country and Vernon sat at a table that was exquisitely set atop a hill overlooking a field of barley against a backdrop of the City of Armstrong and mountains. The package went in the silent auction for just over $300. The winner had never heard of Fieldstone Organics and had not been to the mill location previously. The staff prepared and served the food. All of the ingredients used were purchased in Armstrong.

Barb Munro, marketing and events person at Fieldstone, wrote about the lunch: “The rain we so desperately needed arrived about two hours prior and stopped just as our guests sat down to eat. Besides an assortment of sprouted whole grain salads blended with locally grown produce, there was a selection of cheeses from local artisan producers, locally-raised organic chicken, fresh bread from Country Bakery and delicious Vom Fass oils and vinegars, as well as an assortment of fine chocolates from Chocoliro. The six seemed to be amazed by the setup and enjoyed their lunch.”

 

I WAS A MINORITY AT BUTCHART GARDENS

On my recent trip to visit the family in Victoria, my 14-year-old granddaughter and I toured Butchart Gardens. She is mixed race, and I found I was a minority on that busy day. I was white, English-speaking, and not taking pictures with a phone at the end of a stick.

 

CAUGHT IN A CAR-BUS ACCIDENT

On my way home from Victoria I learned from CBC Radio when I was in Kamloops that there was a car-bus crash 11 km west of Chase and the highway was closed both ways. I hung around the city for a few hours, then at 7:30 I decided surely it would be open by then. It wasn’t. I was stuck in a long line-up. At 9 p.m. the full moon peeked over the mountain to my right. The accident happened at 4 p.m. The 19-year-old Pritchard boy who was driver of the car was killed instantly, and many of the Korean students in the tour bus were injured. The bus driver had the worst injuries. Such a tragic start to a long weekend.

At 10 p.m. the highway was re-opened and what seemed like thousands of cars and semis were on the move. The man in the moon guided me all the way home to Salmon Arm. My sympathy to family members of the Pritchard boy who lost his life.

 

SOPRANO MELINA MOORE PRESENTS A JUDY GARLAND TRIBUTE AT HANEY

Enjoy a salute to the golden age of Hollywood at RJ Haney Heritage Village & Museum on Saturday, August 22 presented by Vernon coloratura soprano Melina Moore. She will be joined by Jim Leonard on piano, Doug Sonju playing clarinet/sax, and Rod MacDonald on bass.

This is a dinner and show evening and seating is limited. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased by calling the village 250-832-5243 or buying at Askew’s Foods in both stores in Salmon Arm.

www.salmonarmmuseum.org or facebook.com/Haneyheritage. R.J. Haney Heritage Village is located at 751 Highway 97B Salmon Arm, near the junction with Highway #1.

 

PEI HAS COSTLIEST CELL PHONE FINE IN CANADA

Do not get caught using a cell phone while driving in Prince Edward Island because the fine is $1,200. It is the highest distracted driving fine in Canada. B.C.’s fine is $167, the second lowest in the country.

On June 16, 2015, B.C.’s Attorney General Suzanne Anton launched a four-week public consultation into whether the penalties given for distracted driving should be raised.

 

LAID OFF OIL WORKERS, FOREST SECTOR NEEDS YOU

If you or someone you know is short of work due to the slowdown in the oil sands, check out the forest industry. There are shortages of skilled trades all over Canada. That was the information from Thunder Bay, Ontario on CBC.ca.

The union says there are high-paying jobs in northwestern Ontario mills, but few takers despite lucrative salaries. Unifor’s national representative said, “The wages are very lucrative right now and the resumes should be flowing in quite steadily and they’re not.”

 

ABORTION PILL APPROVED IN CANADA

Health Canada has approved the use of the abortion pill RU-486. A senior government source told the Huffington Post Canada that RU-486, also known as mifepristone, will be allowed for use in Canada but can be obtained only through a physician. The brand name under which it will be sold in Canada is Mifegymiso.

What a relief it will be for those women who find themselves in a difficult situation. 

 

DO NOT FALL FOR A TELEPHONE SCAM

Many are familiar with the Nigerian email scam and/or the Grandma/Grandpa calls, but this message could be VERY scary to many people, especially seniors.

One of my friends got a scam call from Officer Daniel White of the Canadian Revenue Agency telling him that the CRA is “seeking legal official notice against your name for tax fraud. Before this goes to Federal Claims Court... before you get arrested... call me at 613-366-3838.”  That was the number that showed on the call display. Hang up if you receive such a call.

 

WHAT WOULD WE PLANT IN A FOOD FOREST?

Seattle is planning to build a new city park filled with hundreds of edible plants, such as fruit trees, vegetable plants, herbs, etc. Crops will be free to anyone and everyone. If successful, it will be the first “food forest” of the nation.

If we were to build such a park in a community in the Shuswap, what kind of hardy, easy-care plants would you suggest? How about rhubarb, asparagus and crabapples to start?

“Borrowed” for Facebook from HeartMath’s Global Coherence Initiative: A Food Forest.

AUGUST 7, 2015

 

LOOKING BACK THROUGH CARDBOARD BOXES

As I am continually downsizing, I am finding scribbled notes that haven’t seen the light of day.

I started the paper in 1975 and it was the only full distribution paper at the time. These were some comments in the first few years:

Paul Angell: “You’re doing all right. I didn’t think you’d make a go of it when you started.”

Ron Brown: “You’ve got to be more professional!”

Vic Bates: “I’m convinced it’s your paper that’s bringing me more business.”

Don Dunn denied an increase in business, but kept advertising.

Ken Allen: “Your little paper is the best thing!”

Peter Brodoway: “That’s the best damn paper around.”

These had no name: “What does a woman know about a paper?” “She’ll last the first month.” “She must be trying to prove this is women’s lib year.” “You’ve got it made.”

A man was taken aback when he came to the office and saw that I wasn’t a young chick because that’s how I wrote. He said: “You’re unique. You don’t speak as you write. Most people write the way they talk, but you don’t.”

 

BECAUSE I WAS A WOMAN, I COULDN’T GET A LOAN

Harry Francis, my mentor, was the owner of Kamloops News. He advised me not to start a paper till I had $5,000 in the bank. But I had only $4,000 when the time was right in March, 1975. When I was running out of money I went to the Bank of Montreal to borrow $1,000. The manager said he couldn’t give it to me till I had my husband’s signature. So I made another appointment and brought Jim with me.

 

A SALESMAN DIDN’T WANT TO SEE A WOMAN

In 1975, a salesman of newspaper equipment came to the upstairs of what is Wearabouts where Jim had a financial consulting office and I had the newspaper. He saw Jim at his desk across the hall and came to my counter to ask if he could see the man in his office. I told him to go right in. The salesman sat down and began his pitch about newspaper equipment. Jim harshly said he needs to see me because I own the newspaper. He came to my front desk rather sheepishly.

 

SMART CARS USED BY NEW YORK CITY POLICE

The New York Police Department added eight Smart Cars earlier in 2015 to replace eight three-wheeled scooters. The cars can be driven 90 miles per hour but are not to be used in police chases. According to an internal memo, they can be more versatile than the larger police cruisers. Even though they have a passenger seat, they are not allowed to carry a passenger. They have air bags and air conditioning, and are safer than a three-wheeled scooter. The NYPD is so happy with the results that it plans to buy 100 more to replace the aging scooters.

Each car is plastered with regular-sized NYPD logos. See about 40 pictures of them by googling NYPD Smart Cars.

 

NEW YORK STATE RAISES FAST FOOD PAY

Fast food pay in the state of New York will go up from the current minimum wage of $8.75 to $15 an hour. Food costs will also go up. It is expected other industries will follow. It may take several years for the legislation to be passed. Many cities have already increased their minimum wage to $15, like Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. 

Will Canada follow and increase its bottom wage to $15?

 

FREE PANCAKE BRUNCH DOWNTOWN IN A WEEK

Enjoy tasty pancakes and listen to Roots & Blues musicians next Saturday, August 15, which is midway through the Roots & Blues Festival at the fairgrounds. The free brunch will be at the Ross Street plaza from 9 a.m. to 12 noon, sponsored by Downtown Salmon Arm and Salmon Arm Folk Music Society. Music starts at 9:40 a.m. and goes until 11:20 a.m. Experience the festival atmosphere right downtown.

Daybreak Rotary members will be flipping pancakes as they serve the brunch. While the brunch is free, Rotarians will have a container where you can donate to one of the club’s charities.

Walk downtown where many merchants will have a Saturday sidewalk sale. For more info, go to www.salmonarmdowntown.com or call 250-832-5440.

 

ENTER FLOWERS IN ENDERBY’S FLOWER SHOW

Enter as many flowers as you wish, and in as many classes as you wish, at the annual Enderby & District Garden Club’s flower show on Saturday, August 15. There are no entry fees. Out-of-town gardeners are welcome to participate. Exhibitors should arrive between 8:00 and 9:30 a.m. at the Seniors' Complex on the highway in Enderby. For all the rules, show schedule, and information, look for the brochure at the Visitor's Centre in Enderby’s Belvidere Park, Crocus Floral Design in Enderby, Hanna & Hanna Orchards in Salmon Arm, Blue Mountain Nursery in Armstrong, and Swan Lake Nursery in Vernon.

The show will be open for viewing by the public from noon to 3:30 p.m. It’s free. Everyone is welcome. For more information phone Rob Lindsay 250-836-5464.

 

KINDALE THRIFT STORE RECYCLING PROGRAM

What isn’t sold in Kindale’s thrift stores is sent to a company that re-sorts it. Forty per cent of clothing is sent to Africa, 20 per cent is used to make industrial rags, 20 per cent is processed into yarn to make blankets, and 20 per cent is shredded to use as packing material. JPW Road & Bridge Inc. stores the recycling. In 2014, Kindale and JPW kept 89,384 pounds out of the landfill, and that doesn’t include what was sold in its stores.

Kindale is a non-profit, charitable, community-supported society that began in Armstrong in 1959 as a school for children with special needs. It has grown into a large and diverse organization serving individuals in Cherryville, Lumby, Lavington, Greater Vernon, Armstrong, Spallumcheen, Falkland, Enderby, Salmon Arm, Blind Bay, Sicamous, Grindrod and Revelstoke.

Thrift stores are located in Armstrong and Salmon Arm. One hundred per cent of proceeds support the hopes, wishes and dreams of a segment of the population that is often forgotten, according to a brochure. Volunteers are always needed in thrift stores.

For more information on Kindale Development Association, go to www.kindale.net and search Facebook for Kindale.Okanagan. 250-546-3005.

 

SEND PRESS RELEASES TO DAILY ONLINE PAPER

While searching the internet for news about Chances, I found a new newspaper called Interior Daily News. Was it Black Press? Kamloops This Week? Glacier Media Group? I need to know! No, the Interior Daily News says it’s a local Canadian online newspaper serving the majority of BC’s interior as well as covering major events and concerts happening in Vancouver. It launched on January 15, 2012 and says it has had three and a half successful years reporting. It does not say who owns it.

Here’s something unique about it: you can read it in any language. I scrolled to Ukrainian and instantly, every word was in Ukrainian. It must have an instant translator. If you find out who owns it, please let me know.

 

MOUNTAIN EQUIP. CO-OP COMING TO KELOWNA

People from throughout Canada buy a membership and shop at the Canadian-owned Mountain Equipment Co-op. If you’re an outdoorsy type, going into an MEC is like going into Costco for one item and coming out with a full shopping cart.

Stores closest to us are in Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Victoria or online. In the spring of 2016, MEC will take over the 20,000 square-foot space at Kelowna’s Orchard Plaza Shopping Centre formerly occupied by Future Shop.

 

CALGARY MUSLIMS TRAIN THEIR YOUTH TO BE COMPLETELY CANADIAN, EVEN THE CITY'S MAYOR

A mosque in Calgary, whose almost 1,000 members were in Salmon Arm for the Victoria Day weekend in May, celebrated Canada Day because they are completely part of Canada. An article in Maclean’s magazine said they feed about 6,000 people at their annual Canada Day barbecue. The public comes to the Baitun Nur Ahmadiyya Mosque for food and activities for kids and adults.

Sultan Mahmood, the director of community services, was quoted as saying they celebrate everything good in Canada. The mosque has a big TV and people watch hockey matches. They have been putting stickers on their cars saying “Go Flames, Go.” He said they have chosen Canada to be their homeland and, following the teaching of Prophet Muhammad, they must be good members of civic society, to be loyal and to promote Canadian values and culture, and to ask God to protect anything that goes against Canadian interests.

 

HUNDREDS OF HOCKEY FAMILIES WILL DESCEND ON SALMON ARM THIS MONTH

Visit Shaw Centre this month and watch Salmon Arm Hockey School in action as it starts its 36th season. This year, Female Hockey School is being introduced, August 17 to 21.

Its brochure shows coaching for boys aged 4, 6, 8, up to 17. Some week-long classes are called Shoot to Score, Defenceman School, Fundamental Skills, Goalie School, and Power Skating.

Get details at www.salmonarmhockeyschool.com

Thank you, co-owners Gord Macintosh, Ray Sakaki and Tom Marsh for bringing a wealth of hockey expertise to the Shaw Centre and organizing the hockey school for its 36th season.

 

 

 

JULY 31, 2015

 

LOOKING BACK THROUGH CARDBOARD BOXES

My kids shouldn’t have to decide what to keep and what to throw out when I kick the bucket, so I am going through cardboard boxes full of memories. There are things I can’t throw out without sharing them with you. Here is the first instalment of looking back in the life of Sally Scales as taken from my scribbled notes. This first one was two years before I started this newspaper. Enjoy!

 

LOOKING BACK 42 YEARS IN SALMON ARM

In 1973, there was a rumour that Salmon Arm would get two shopping centres. One would be up on the hill east of town and the other would be west. Lloyd Askew of Askew’s Foods was extremely worried and came to the laundromat Jim and I operated to ask Jim if he would sit on a committee with him to prevent the two centres. Jim knew I wanted to start a newspaper and needed to get known by the business community so he suggested Lloyd ask me, which he did. That summer the Downtown Improvement Association was formed.

This is one paragraph from a letter I wrote to my parents in Watson, Saskatchewan on June 19, 1973:

“Have you been reading in the Salmon Arm paper about two shopping centres wanting to start, one to the east and one to the west of town? I have been working with the downtown businessmen, trying to prevent both from starting. If we have two, they will be poor and so will the downtown. We have been having meetings, and we prepared a brief to council which I typed and sent out. We even called a public meeting of all businesses in the town.”

 

TIMES HAVE CHANGED!

I joined the Co-op in Salmon Arm in 1973 when I was a registered nurse. It sold groceries, clothing, hardware, lumber and many other goods. But my membership had to be in my husband’s name. So my dividend cheques came in his name. Times have changed.

 

OVER 100 AUTOS ON DISPLAY AT HANEY VILLAGE

Car shows are fun for the whole family. The 16th Annual Classic Antique Car Show will take place on Sunday, August 9th at R.J. Haney Heritage Village, and will feature over a hundred classic and antique automobiles on display throughout the village. This car show has become a favourite among car collectors, fans and spectators from far and wide. Gate admission is adults: $7.00, kids 5-12: $4.00, 4 and under: free. Guests can enter anytime after 8:30 a.m.

Everyone is welcome to participate. If you are interested in displaying your vehicle, registration is free. Bring your automobile between 8 and 10 a.m. Registered cars and trucks will receive a commemorative car show ribbon to display and have the opportunity to win the People’s Choice Awards.

 

MANY FOREST FIRES DURING THIS DRY YEAR

The province has been battling many forest fires this summer, well over 1,000, and far surpassing the firefighting budget. The Okanagan has been hard hit. Premier Christy Clark visited her riding of West Kelowna which had several fires, and she accompanied Prime Minister Stephen Harper when he visited firefighters in Shelter Cove in West Kelowna. Last Thursday, the Kamloops Fire Centre reported that the Shelter Bay fire was estimated at 430 hectares in size and was zero per cent contained. The wildfire caused power failure for many residents of Westside Road. A most welcome rain came on Friday night.

The Prime Minister visited northern Saskatchewan, which also had many fires, and was hosted by Premier Brad Wall. With climate change causing more hot dry summers, Stephen Harper said the federal government may contribute financially to the incredible firefighting costs of the two hardest-hit provinces.

 

WHERE WERE YOU DURING THE FIRE OF 1998?

I felt rather complacent living in Salmon Arm while so many other parts of the province were having wildfires. I often recalled the panic we experienced in 1998 when the Silver Creek fire was coming close and half the town of 14,000 was evacuated. Where were you during the fire of 1998?

 

CHANCES GAMING CENTRE OPENED JULY 20

Chances gaming centre opened on Monday, July 20 on Adams Lake Indian Band property that was formerly used by Salmon Arm GM. After a fire destroyed much of the dealership, a large, modern building was erected east of town, a few blocks past McDonald’s.

Chances is across 10th Street SW from the Shell gas station. It is a three-way collaboration of B.C. Lottery Corporation, Berezan Management and the Adams Lake Indian Band. Berezan hired 85 people. The fabulous interior has 99 slot machines, one electronic blackjack machine and 124 electronic and 24 paper bingo seats. The beautiful building will include banquet and meeting space which will be available for conferences and community events.

Chances is open from 11 a.m. to midnight from Sunday to Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. You don’t have to go out of town to play, folks!

 

LOBLAWS IS CLOSING 52 STORES IN CANADA

BUT LEAVING DISCOUNTERS LIKE NO FRILLS

Loblaw acquired Shoppers Drug Mart in early 2014, and since then has been reviewing all its retail operations. It plans to close 52 unprofitable stores but will open new ones in better locations this year. Loblaw Companies Ltd. operates other supermarkets: Great Canadian Superstore, No Frills and Extra Foods.

 

ENDERBY’S FLOWER SHOW IS ON AUGUST 15

Read details in next week’s column about Enderby’s flower show on Aug. 15. Exhibitors may want to get all the rules, show schedule, and information in the brochure that is available at the Visitor’s Centre in Enderby’s Belvidere Park, Crocus Floral Design in Enderby, Hanna & Hanna Orchards in Salmon Arm, Blue Mountain Nursery in Armstrong, and Swan Lake Nursery in Vernon.

 

COMMERCIAL CARDBOARD RECYCLING

If you have a business that produces plenty of flattened cardboard from boxes, there is a special container for you to use near the landfill site by the airport. I began putting cardboard into it until the full-time employee at the recycling centre there told me it’s only for businesses that don’t have a cardboard bin of their own. She showed me where householders are to place their cardboard and loose newspapers. She’s a great help.

Corrugated cardboard is pulped and pressed into fibres that become cereal boxes, egg cartons, and cardboard boxes depending on the mix of papers.

Styrofoam egg cartons with a logo and printing on top are considered coloured. They are not to go with white styrofoam. That’s what I learned at the recycling depot up top.

 

SCAM PHONE CALLS

In a recent phone call, my name and number showed up in the call display. How could that be? So I answered it. The recorded voice gave me a warning about my credit card that might be cancelled if I didn’t take action and said I should press one to continue or two to not get any more calls. I pressed two, but the voice came back and said for more information I should press one. I pressed two, and was told it was the wrong number. I hung up.

 

MY FRIENDS IMMEDIATELY SAY HELLO SALLY

When my phone rings and I pick it up, I want to hear someone greet me right away. If there is a pause, it is one computer signalling another to say there’s a live one, start the pitch. I hang up. I do not want to hear a recorded message because it is usually a scam.

 

FORTY HOCKEY TEAMS HERE FOR TOURNAMENTS

Gord Macintosh, Ray Sakaki and Tom Marsh, co-owners of Salmon Arm Hockey School, are expanding this year to include not only Female Hockey School, but also adult hockey tournaments. Next week will see many families who bring kids for hockey school. This week it will be adults playing. Aug. 4-7 will be 70-and-over and 65-and-over. Aug. 7-9 will be 40-and-over, 50-and-over and ladies’ division. Aug. 21-23 will have adult rec and co-ed tournaments.

The partners are excited about bringing over 40 teams to Shaw Centre for summer hockey action!

 

NOISY BOATS DISTURB THE PEACE AND THE BIRDS

A summer resident between Herald Park and Totem Pole Resort said this summer there are many speed boats on Shuswap Lake that disturb the peace, especially on weekends. There are hardly any birds in the area. Okanagan Lake does not allow the noisy boats. Their owners must have moved them to Shuswap Lake.

 

PUT VALUABLES IN TRUNK, OUT OF SITE

Vernon RCMP spokesman Gord Molendyk said people should keep all valuables out of site. Items should be placed in the trunk of the vehicle before arriving at your destination because thieves sometimes watch parking lots and look for people putting items in the trunk.

 

TOURISM SHUSWAP HAS INCREDIBLE NEWSLETTER

Every week I receive a newsletter full of happenings in the Shuswap. I subscribed at http://shuswaptourism.ca, and suggest you do the same if you will be getting summer visitors. The newsletter always highlights Wednesday on the Wharf and Roots & Blues Festival. Most events have pictures.

Do you have an event to publicize?  Email your event details to info@shuswaptourism.ca

 

DID YOU KNOW?

Mosquito bite? Warm a spoon under hot water and place the rounded part on top of the bite. The heat will destroy the protein that caused the reaction and the itching will stop.

 

JULY 24, 2015

 

THIRTY-TWO KIDS HAD FUN AT A SPORTS CAMP

I popped in at the Epic Sports Academy last Friday morning, the last day it was at Shuswap Middle School, at the invitation of Gregg Nicholson. The gym was full of excited kids aged 7-12 in three different sports, being led by three teenagers, two girls and a boy employed by Epic, assisted by Gregg and his wife Michelle. The floor was marked into three playing fields for indoor soccer, basketball and borden ball, which is a variation of flag football. When a whistle blew every half hour, the kids moved to a different sport. On the school field, the kids played flag football, field lacrosse and World Cup soccer.

Ten years ago, Gregg and Michelle started a summer basketball camp in Armstrong, where both are teachers. It was such a fun business, says Michelle, that they kept adding more sports. In 2013, when they came to Salmon Arm, they changed the name from Armstrong to Epic. Their goal is to provide a sports camp for kids where they would have fun, and to boost their self-esteem.

The August sports in action camp will be in Armstrong August 10-14 and Salmon Arm August 17-21. It is held from 9 to 3 Monday to Friday. Cost is $200. www.epic-sports-academy.com, 250-503-6661 or nick10@telus.net.

 

CENTURY 21 EXECUTIVES REALTY EXPANDS

TO FORMER HONDA BUILDING ON AUGUST 3

Bill Hubbard started Century 21 Executives Realty in 2000 in Vernon with two people.

As the owner/broker he now has over 60 sales people. He expanded into Enderby in 2006 and has recently opened a new office in the little yellow house by the roundabout in Sicamous. I asked how he survived the recession and this was his reply:

“We survived because of our outside-the-box Vision 25 marketing and service package. When the going gets tough the tough get creative. It is based on high-end customer service like professional photographers, moving trucks, Air Miles and aggressive global marketing and advertising. Our company grew exponentially because of this plan, and it will be a huge part of our beautiful new office in the former Honda building at Crosstown Centre in Salmon Arm when we open on August 3. We plan to raise the bar on customer service and attention to detail for our customers in the Salmon Arm area and to give a buying and selling experience to our customers that is not equaled anywhere in the Okanagan Shuswap.”

 

FORMER HONDA BUILDING HAS A NEW NAME

OK folks, Crosstown Centre is the new name for the former Honda building. Thanks, Bill Laird, for buying the building that sat empty for a few years, filling the main floor with Thread & Paper Crafts Ltd., D&G Computers and, in 10 days, Century 21, and renaming it Crosstown Centre. 

 

MOST PEOPLE ABIDE BY THE RULES ABOUT NO

SMOKING, LIQUOR OR DOGS AT CANOE BEACH

Canoe Beach proper is very busy this summer. The city-owned and managed sandy beach is eight km from downtown Salmon Arm and is accessed from the main parking area through a tunnel under the CPR track. Some people are not aware that city bylaws state there is to be no smoking, no open liquor and no dogs running loose. Dogs must be on a leash until they are taken to the off-leash area on the other side of a fence on the east side of Canoe Beach closer to Canoe Mill. There they can romp around freely and swim as long as they are in the actual custody and control of their owner or agent. Canoe Park is open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. No overnighting is allowed.

Salmon Arm Citizens Patrol walks through the park regularly as part of its job to be extra eyes and ears for the RCMP. Citizens Patrol members appreciate all the happy waves and positive comments from beach-goers who like the fact that members monitor Canoe Beach on a regular basis.

 

BUY ORGANIC BISON MEAT AT FARMERS’ MARKETS

Laine Keyes of Turtle Valley Bison Ranch sells frozen bison meat at Shuswap Farm and Craft Market in Salmon Arm every Friday. He also takes the truck with freezers to markets in Kamloops, Scotch Creek and Vernon. Besides markets, bison meat is sold to restaurants up and down the Okanagan valley.

Laine is from the 130-herd bison ranch in Turtle Valley near Chase. He said calves are kept for two years before they are processed. This is the second year for the ranch. See pictures of the bison and the key players at www.turtlevalleyranch.com. Phone 250-318-6019. My bison burgers were delicious!

 

BUY A PACKAGE OF LADYBUGS FOR YOUR GARDEN

Buckerfields sells ladybugs, according to a message on a chalkboard in the store. One of the clerks said they are kept in a fridge upstairs so they will stay dormant. She brought one down for me to see. One of the ladybugs stretched its arms and legs as if to wake up. The cost for a package of 250 is $14.99.

Wikipedia says ladybugs are generally considered useful insects, because many species feed on aphids or scale insects, which are pests in gardens, agricultural fields, orchards, and similar places. Within the colonies of such plant-eating pests, they will lay hundreds of eggs, and when these hatch, the larvae will commence feeding immediately. They will look for a safe place around your house to spend the winter. 

I went back the next day and bought a package. I kept it in the fridge because instructions say ladybugs need to be released in the cool evening or early morning onto roses, shrubs or trees that have been misted. Ladybugs feed on aphids and other soft bodied insects that feed on plants as the adult ladybug and as the larva. One ladybug can eat as many as 50 aphids a day. www.ladybuglady.com

Releasing is not easy. I recommend wetting a branch, releasing some ladybugs into a bread bag, and slipping it onto the branch.

 

MANY PERKS FOR VOLUNTEERS AT ROOTS & BLUES

You can help the city’s largest music festival become successful by being a volunteer. The 23rd annual Salmon Arm Roots & Blues Festival is on August 14, 15 and 16. Festival organizers reduced the number of volunteers required, but about 200 are still needed. Volunteers are needed for: raffle ticket sales, parking crew, backstage décor, wine lounge, documentary crew, festival ambassadors, and infrastructure crew because the set-up crew gets the weekend off.

These are the perks every volunteer gets: FREE weekend pass, and FREE Sunday night volunteer party with food, music, drinks and fun. To volunteer, contact Jeff at vca2@rootsandblues.ca or 250-833-4096.

 

HAVE FUN AS A VOLUNTEER AT HANEY VILLAGE

Every year, there is an increase in visitors and activities at R.J. Haney Heritage Village. With the increase comes a need for more volunteers. The Volunteer Opportunities page on the website has been updated and is more accessible. Please check it at www.salmonarmmuseum.org. It has a list of 27 preferred volunteer areas in the village and museum from which you can choose, and also the days and hours when you prefer to volunteer.

There are opportunities for all ages, and it’s a great way for students to gain experience and volunteer hours. Volunteers receive training while working in a historic, friendly, and relaxed atmosphere. It is an opportunity to meet new people while sharing much needed skills. In return, volunteers gain free admittance to enjoy events they are scheduled to help with. An appreciation luncheon is held at the end of the season and levels of hours acquired are rewarded with prizes.

If you have questions, contact Tara Watson, volunteer coordinator at 250-832-5243 or volunteer@salmonarmmuseum.org

 

ENJOY DINNER THEATRE ANY WED., FRI. OR SUN.

After dinner, guests will hop aboard C.P.R. Parlour Car 2426 and take a trip to Western Canada with four cast members at R.J. Haney Heritage Village. This summer, Villains and Vittles dinner theatre productions presents The Everlasting Railway Blues. Enjoy a home cooked dinner with all the pioneer fixings served at 6 p.m. from Marjorie’s Tea Room. Dessert follows the play with homemade rhubarb crisp and ice cream. Reservations are a must! Call 250-832-5243. Adults $25, seniors $22, children five to 12 are $14. Four and under are free. 

 

GET RID OF WARTS, EXCESS WEIGHT, INSOMNIA

Homeopath News is an email full of simple remedies. Jude Corfield, a registered homeopath trained in Britain, operates Shuswap Homeopathy Clinic in Salmon Arm. She has great success treating warts on the body and writes in her newsletter: “There are many different homeopathic medicines for the wide varieties of warts. Often in the first week of applying a homeopathic remedy, warts literally fall off and the skin heals.” The charge in her clinic is $170 for a first visit which is two hours, when she takes a full history. www.shuswaphomeopathy.ca.

Jude was chosen as one of 100 BC Women Entrepreneurs by the Women’s Enterprise Centre. She teaches a three-day course called “Running a Successful Homeopathic Practice” and has given workshops for alternative health practitioners setting up in business in Vancouver, Kelowna, Salmon Arm and Nanaimo. To subscribe to her newsletter or to contact Jude, call 250-804-0104 or email judehomeopath@live.ca.

 




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